Monday, December 20, 2010

I met a man today

(this post is not my normal “lighten up” type post. If you think you have life figured out then you’re a fool. Life has so many twists, turns, surprise events it’s like figuring out the route of the next tornado.)

I met a man today.

He was different from the man I had known. Yet he was the same man in many ways. He appearance has strikingly changed from the man I had spent time with months ago. His body has thinned. His hair short and white.

Cancer.

I was told before he showed up. Also told that he didn’t want to talk about it.

We talked. We only talked about his past travels to places I’ve never been. Never was the ‘C’ word spoken.

He laughed. He played with the grandkids. I enjoyed his company.

Is it sadder because it is the Christmas season? Cancer doesn’t care what time of year it is.

He is more private than me but that’s OK. The greatness of humanity comes from its diversity. I don’t know what I would do in his situation, but that doesn’t matter. He shared some his time and I’m thankful.

He is a kind man and I hope to meet him again and hear more about his travels again.

13 comments:

Bearmancartoons said...

I don't know anyone who hasn't been touched by this terrible disease. All the best to your friend.

californiagirl500 said...

you capture his dignity.

savannah said...

RESPECT.

kids use the word to acknowledge admiration for a person. you have mine for the dignity of your writing and his for dealing with his life on his terms. well done, sugar. xoxoxox

lisleman said...

thanks. I do find amazing in a great way that you don't know anyone who has or had cancer. It's good to know that some people have not been affected it.

lisleman said...

thanks

lisleman said...

thanks

Dwmatty said...

Cancer is no stranger to my family. Everyone deals with it in their own way. Some, like your friend, don't talk about it. Others discuss it freely. With technology advancing at such a rapid pace, some day there will be a cure.

lisleman said...

No stranger here either. You are right everyone handles things differently. I suspect that younger generations might be more open to discussing it. thanks

gaelikaa said...

I always read cancer posts carefully. You know, I lost my dad to cancer when I was just 13. My mother, on the other hand, is a cancer survivor. She's still alive and you know I'm 47 and I still need to have my mother around somewhere. I think your friend is doing exactly the right thing, living his life to the full. That's what it's all about.

lisleman said...

I've lost both my parents now but I was in my 30's. Having to deal with a loss at such an early age must have been tough.
My friend I believe does try to get the most from life. It does no go to give up.

joaniemack said...

I hope you do get to spend time with him again and again and again.

I think we've all been touched by cancer. Some want to discuss it... others not so much.

lisleman said...

I hope so too. thanks

TechnoBabe said...

When my son-in-law had pancreatic cancer, he didn't want to talk about it either. My other daughter and her husband had not seen him in a couple months and we all got together for that Mothers Day and my younger daughter was so shocked she hid out in the restroom much of the time. He passed away two months later. However much time someone has I hope they don't have to spend it talking about the disease but instead have something to wake up to each day.

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